Logon Analyzer
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OVERVIEW LAPTOP LOCALIZATION SPECIFICATIONS

Let's say that you have opened a live pane of a floor on an entrance screen, showing the occupancy of all the workplaces on that floor. This live pane is updated every two seconds.

If someone logs on to a computer, the workplace turns red, signalling that that particular workplace is occupied. If someone logs off, the workplace turns green, signalling that that workplace is free again.

When you only have static, cabled computers, this is all pretty straight forward. No triangulation needs to be performed, because you have added workplaces to your map, and then you have added the static cabled computers to your workplaces. There's no question about the whereabouts of your computers, and therefore, no question about the whereabouts of an end user who has just logged on.

But what if some or all of your end users use wireless, roaming laptops? How does evaluation of wireless, roaming laptops work?

Let's say that someone enters a room with his or her wireless, roaming laptop. Sits down behind a workplace, opens his or her laptop, and logs on. Here are the specifications that are used to place this user (or better still, his or her wireless, roaming laptop) on your live pane:

1. First, the most likely workplace is calculated via triangulation. This delivers a floor and possibly a room.
2. Possible locations are restricted to all the workplaces in the same room or on the same floor.
3. Next, a check is done if the same user has logged on to another computer on any of these workplaces. If so, the user is added to this workplace.

Implicitly, the presumption is made that the end user will most likely log on under the same account on different computers, simply because an average end user only has one logon account. So, if someone has already logged on to another computer in the same room, the user is added to that computer's workplace.

Here's what happens if the user is not found in the same space:

1. A search is started for the first empty workplace without a static desktop computer.
2. If no such workplace is found, a search is started for the first empty workplace with a static desktop computer.
3. If no such workplace is found, a search is started for the first occupied workplace onto which someone has already logged on.
4. Finally, if no workplace has been found by now, the user is added to the original, most likely workplace.

So, a laptop and its user are not always placed on the most likely workplace. The existing occupation of the workplaces in the same space are taken into account.

And once a laptop and its user has been placed on the map of your live pane, it will be kept there until the user logs off. This is to prevent laptops from jumping all over the place when someone loggs on or off.